“PRACTICE MAKES A PERFECTION”

 

 

BRIEF HISTORY OF KARATE DO

Where Karate Began?

Very little is known of the exact origins of karate before it appeared in Okinawa (Okinawa is an archipelago, island chain) but one popular theory states that it came from India by a Buddhist monk called Bodhidharma (Daruma Daishi in Japanese). 

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The historical accuracy of this legend is still an issue of debate today.  In 527 A.D, Bodhidharma travelled from India to China’s Henan Province with the aim of teaching the true Buddhism to the monks of the Shaolin Temple. However, he found that the Shaolin monks were too weak to endure the long hours of meditative practice, so, Bodhidharma taught them exercises that would strengthen their bodies and minds. Under Bodhidharma’s teaching, the monks reached an extraordinary development. They remained in the Monastery 12 years, approximately, and at the end of this time, they left the monastery to travel to several different places. The monks who settled in the north of China developed what would be known as the “Foot of the North”, this occurred since in the North there were plains, open spaces and horses, as well as horse-riders. This required the monks to run and jump high to be able to forcibly dismount other fighters from the horses. Meanwhile, those who settled in the South developed the “Fist of the South”. In that region, the use of kicking techniques was quite difficult because there were many boats and ships, for which the use of hands, elbows, and knees to attack and defend was developed. For the fighting style that was developed, stability and close combat were of fundamental importance. Due to the trading relationships between China and the Ryukyu Kingdom, Okinawa’s culture was greatly influenced by the Chinese. Some military and commercial envoys took these fighting techniques to Okinawa with the name of TODE, which means ‘the hand of the continent’ or ‘the hand of China’. At the beginning, Karate was studied by the “commoners” who wanted to elevate their position and serve various kings at Shuri Castle. Nevertheless, karate could not be practiced by farmers or peasants, as they did not have the time to study such things. In 1509, it was King Shō Shin who put an end to the feudalistic period of the Ryūkyū Kingdom through the ‘Act of Eleven Distinctions’, which prohibited the stockpiling and possession of weapons. As a result, unarmed combat began to be cultivated more vigorously. In 1610 when Tokugawa Leyasu, the founder of the last shogunate in Japan (1603-1867), was the Shogun of Japan (the Shogun was a General Commander of all army forces in Japan. He had all the military and political power, meanwhile, the Emperor had the spiritual and religious power), the invasion of Ryukyu by forces of the Satsuma clan of Kyushu took place. The clan held power over Ryukyu kings for 270 years. The war to conquer Okinawa took place from March to May and marked the beginning of the Ryukyu Kingdom’s status as a vassal state under the Satsuma clan. The invasion forces were met with stiff resistance from the Ryukyu military. Ryukyu would remain a vassal state under the Satsuma clan, alongside its already long-established tributary relationship with China, until it was formally annexed by Japan in 1879 as Okinawa Prefecture. When the Satsuma clan took power, they prohibited all weapons and the practice of all martial arts by the Okinawans. It is said that the Okinawans fought fiercely before the Satsuma samurai over-powered them. Karate is a Japanese word that means ‘empty hands’. The concept of the ‘Art of the Hand of China’ was slightly modified to mean Karate-Do “Empty-hand” instead of “Hand of China” after one of the Okinawan masters, named Anko Itosu (1831-1915), altered the meaning of the word Kara to mean “empty” rather than “Chinese.” Karate-do is to be translated now as ‘the way of the empty hand’.  The Okinawan Karate of today has been developed over centuries and is not the result of a single founder. Many masters contributed to the development of this art, hence it is a combination of Chinese martial arts (quanfa in Chinese and kenpō in Japanese). As explained above, it was not called Karate at first, but it was referred to as ‘te’ or ‘bushi no te’ and ‘bushi nu tii’ in Hogen; the later meant ‘the hands of the gentleman warrior’. In Okinawan, the term ‘bushi’ referred to a gentleman warrior, one who was an expert in ‘te’. In Japanese, ‘te’ referred to a samurai warrior. The main purpose of the Okinawan martial art is to be a gentleman first, and a warrior second. These techniques were developed mainly in three cities Shuri, Tomari, and Naha but with very different societal demands, three separate styles emerged: Shuri-te, Tomari-te and Naha-te, collectively, these styles were called Okinawa-te that means Chinese hand, and over time, the styles merged slightly to become just two: Shōrin-ryū, developed near Shuri and Tomari, and Shōrei-ryū, near Naha. The Okinawans once practiced both unarmed and armed combat openly. This was in the time of conflict between the provinces of Ryūkyū, prior to 1429. Military capability had developed through tribal developments and from the Japanese of the Heian Period, travelling to Ryūkyū and returning with the knowledge of swordsmanship and archery. Kobujutsu would probably have existed at the time, permitting an effective defense against the samurai. The bushi also could have taken the weapons of the samurai to use against them. Nonetheless, they were not successful in defending their island from the Japanese, so Karate became shrouded in secrecy during the Satsuma occupation. Rather than ceasing the practice, martial artists began to study at night in darkness to continue to preserve their fighting arts without easily allowing others to see them practicing. Only Okinawans knew that art was practiced. Although the dual concept of Kenpō and Te together as karate had not yet been developed, both were present by the time of the Satsuma occupation. ‘Karate’, in its embryonic form, evidently existed from the 15th or 16th century.

12° Kyu

Advanced White Belt

“KARATE DO DISCIPLINE FOR LIFE”

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I.-THEORY:
1.-Karate-Do.
II.-VOCABULARY:
1.-Sensei.
2.-Kohai.
3.-Jodan.
4.-Chudan.
5.-Gedan.
6.-Ichi, Ni, San, Yon, Go.
III.-TACHIKATAS:
1.-Musubi dachi.
2.-Hachiji dachi, Naute
3.-Naefanchin dachi.
4.-Zenkutzu dachi.
VI. UKE WAZA:
1.-Jodan age uke.
2.-Chudan soto uke.
3.-Gedan barai uke.
V.-TSUKI WAZA:
1.-Seiken tsuki.
2.-Nihon tsuki.
3.-Oi tsuki.
VI.-KERI WAZA:
1.-Kono geri.
VII.-KATA:
1.-Kihon no kata.
VIII.-AYUMI ASHI:
1.-Ashikaite.
2.-Ippon mae ashi.
3.-Ippon ushiro ashi.
IX.-SONOBA KIHON:
X.-IDO KIHON:

11° Kyu

Purple Belt

“PRACTICE MAKES PERFECTION”

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I.-VOCABULARY:
1-Dojo.
2-Tatami..
3-Roku, sichi, hachi, ku, yu.
II.-TUKI WAZA:
1-Yako Tsuki.
III.-KERI WAZA:
1-Mawashi geri.
IV.-KATA:
1-Kihon no Kata.
8 movments.
V.-SONOBA KIHON.
VI.-IDO KIHON

10° Kyu

Advanced Purple Belt

“THE KEY OF THE WORLD IS CONSTANCY”

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I.-THEORY:
1.-Enbusen.
II.-KERI WAZA:
1.-Mae geri.>/H6>
III.-KATA:
1.-Kihon no kata.
IV.-SONOBA KIHON:
V.-IDO KIHON.

REGULAR PROGRAM

10° Kyu

Advanced White Belt

“KARATE DO DISCIPLINE FOR LIFE”

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I.-THEORY:
1.-Karate-Do.
II.-VOCABULARY:
1.-Sensei.
2.-Gakusei
3.-Dojo.
4.-Tatami.
5.-Jodan.
6.-Chudan.
7.-Gedan
8.-Ichi, Ni, San, Yon, Go, Roku, Sichi, Hachi, Ku, Yu.
III.-TACHIKATAS:
1.-Musubi dachi.
2.-Hachiji dachi.
3.-Naefanchin dachi.
4.-Zenkutsu dachi.
IV.-UKE WAZA:
1.-Jodan age uke.
2.-Chudan soto uke.
3.-Guedan barai uke.
V.-TSUKI WAZA:
1.-Seiken tsuki.
2.-Nihon tsuki.
3.-Oi tsuki.
4.-Yako tsuki.
VI.-KERI WAZA:
1.-Konno geri.
2.-Mae geri.
3.-Mawashi geri.
VII.-KATA:
1 Kihon no kata.
VIII.-KUMITE:
1.-Ippon gumite.
2.-Sanbon gumite.
IX.-AYUMI ASHI:
1.-Ippon mae ashi.
2.-Ippon ushiro ashi.
3.-Ashikaite.
X.-SONOBA KIHON.
XI.-IDO KIHON.
XII.-RENZOKU KIHON.

9° KYU

Yellow Belt

“THE MOST POWERFULL MAN IN THE WORLD IS THE ONE WHO OWNS HIMSELF”

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Yellow Belt
I.-THEORY:
1.-Shu Do Kan:
II.-VOCABULARY:
1.-Karate Do Gi:
Kimono, Ovi, Zubon
2 Yu ichi…ni yu.
III.-UKE WAZA:
1.-Kakuto Uke.
2.-Uchi Uke.
3.-Teisho Uke
IV.-TSUKI WAZA:
1.-Sanbon tsuki.
2.-Kizami tsuki.
3.-Tate tsuki
V.-KERI WAZA:
1.-Mae tobi geri.
2.-Yoko geri.
VI.-KATA:
1.-Kihon no kata.
VII.-KUMITE:
1.-Ippon gumite.
2.-Sanbon gumite.
VIII.-AYUMI ASHI:
1.-Mawate.
IX.-SONOBA KIHON
X.-IDO KIHON.
X.-RENZOKU KIHON.

8° KYU

Advanced Yellow Belt

“SELF-CONFIDENCE IS THE FIRST SECRET OF SUCCESS”

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I.-THEORY:
1.-Rei.
II.-VOCABULARY:
1 Yu, ni yu..hiaku.
III.-TACHIKATAS:
1.-Neko ashi dachi.
2.-Heiko dachi.
3.-Fudo dachi.
IV.-UKE WAZA:
1.-Otoshi Kentsui uke.
2.-Yoko Kentsui uke.
3.-Shuto uke.
V.-UCHI WAZA:
1.-Kentsui uchi.
2 Shuto uchi.
VI.-KATA:
1.-Piñan nidan.
VII.-KUMITE:
1.-Ippon gumite.
1.-Sanbon gumite.
1.-Siai gumite.
VIII.-AYUMI ASHI:
1.-Yori ashi.
2.-Hiki ashi.
IX.-SONOBA KIHON Kihon:
X.-IDO KIHON.
XI.-RENZOKU KIHON.

7° Kyu

Orange Belt

“ALTHOUGH I AM OLD I CONTINUE TO LEARN FROM MY STUDENTS”

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Orange Belt
I Theory:
1 Dojo Kun:
Be gentle and kind.
Transcend fear, injustice and violence.
Train with maximum passion and effort.
Be positive and work hard so your body and your spirit can flourish.
Strive for your dreams and be generous.
Conquer oneself through discipline and patience.
II Uke Waza:
1 Soto Barai or Haito Uke
2 Kote Uke.
III Tuki Waza:
1 Ni Ren Tsuki.
2 San Ren Tsuki.
IV Uchi Waza:
1 Uraken Uchi.
2 Haito Uchi.
V Keri Waza:
1 Ushiro Gueri.
2 Ushiro Mawashi Gueri.
VI Kata:
1 Piñan Nidan.
VII Kumite
1 Ippon Gumite.
VIII Ayumi Ashi:
1 Suri Ashi
IX Sonoba Kihon.
X Ido Kihon.

6° Kyu

Advanced Orange Belt

“THE STRONGER MAN IS THE ONE WHO IS ABLE TO DOMINATE HIMSELF”

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I Theory:
1 Emblem meaning:
The Sun: Strenght and power.
The Moon: Softness and harmony.
The Kanji Kara: Empty.
II Tachikatas:
1 Heisoku Dachi. (Sasoe)
2 Migi-Hidari Naehanchin Dachi.
III Uke Waza:
1 Sasae uke.
2 Osae uke.
3 Enpi uke.
IV Uchi Waza:
1 Nukite: Tate, Ague.
2 Enpi Uchi: Tate, Ague, Mawashi, Yoko, Ushiro, Otoshi.
V Keri Waza:
1 Sonoba Tobi Gueri.
2 Nidan Gueri.
VI Kata:
1 Piñan Sandan.
 VII Kumite:
1 Ippon gumite.
2 Siai gumite.
VIII Sonoba Kihon.
IX Ido Kihon.
X Renzoku Waza.

5° Kyu

Green Belt

“THE GREATEST ENEMY IS WITHIN OURSELVES”

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I Theory:
1 Waza:
II Tachikatas:
1 Kosa Dachi.
III Uke Waza:
1 Morote Uke.
IV Tsuki Waza:
1 Hiraken
2 Kagui Tsuki.
3 Morote Tsuki.
V Keri Waza:
1 Ushiro Ura Mawashi Geri.
2 Mawashi Ushiro Gueri.
3 Nanami Geri.
VI Kata:
1 Piñan Shodan.
2 Naefanchin Shodan
VII Kumite:
1 Ippon Gumite.
2 Siai.
VIII Sonoba Kihon.
IX Ido Kihon Kihon.
X Renzoku Waza:

4° Kyu

Advanced Green Belt

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I Theory:
1 Ki: Internal strenght, energy.
II Uke Waza:
1 Kosa Gedan Uke.
2 Torite.
III Uchi Waza:
1 Ippon Ken.
2 Nakadaka Ippon Ken.
IV Keri Waza:
1 Hiza Ate.
2 Mawashi Tobi Gueri.
3 Kizami Mawashi Tobi Gueri.
V Kata:
1 Piñan Yondan.
2 Naefanchin Nidan.
VI Kumite:
1 Ippon gumite.
2 Siai gumite.
VII Sonoba Kihon.
VII Ido Kihon.
VIII Renzoku Waza.</h5

3° Kyu

Brown Belt

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I Theory:
1 Kime.
II Tachikatas:
1 Teiji Dachi.
III Uke Waza:
1 Kosa yodan uke.
2 Kiaku.
3 Gedan Morote Uke.
4 Tenchi Nage
IV Tsuki Waza:
1 Iraken tsuki
V Kata:
1 Piñan Godan.
2 Naefanchin Sandan.
VI Kumite:
1 Ippon Gumite.
2 Siai gumite.
VII.-Sonoba Kihon.
VIII. Ido Kihon.
IX Renzoku Waza.

2° Kyu

Intermediate Brown Belt

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I Kata:
1 Rohai.
2 Tomari No Wanshu.
II Bunkai:
1 One technique by any Kata.
III Kumite:
1 Ippon Gumite.
Displaying Uke, Nague, Erimi.
2 Siai.
IV Sonoba Kihon.
V Ido Kihon.
VI Renzoku Waza.

1° Kyu

Advanced Brown Belt

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I Kata:
1 Jiin.
2 Wankan
II Bunkai:
1 One technique of any Kata
III Kumite:
1 Ippon Gumite.
2 Nihon Gumite.
Displaying Uke, Nague, Erimi.
3 Siai
IV Sonoba Kihon.
V Ido Kihon.
VI Renzoku Waza.

BLACK BELT

SHO DAN HO

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I Uke Waza:
1 Morote Jodan Uke (Wa Uke- sofu kanji).
II Tsuki Waza
1 Yama Tsuki.
III Kata:
1 Passai Dai.
2 Jion.
IV Bunkai:
1 One techique from Passai Dai.
2 One technique from Jion.
V Kumite.
1 Ippon Gumite.
2 Siai Gumite.
V Sonoba Kihon.
VI Ido Kihon.
VII Renzoku Waza.

KATA LIST

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1.- Kihon no Kata
PINAN
PINAN
1.- Nidan
2.- Sandan
3.- Shodan
4.- Yondan
5.- Godan
NAEFANCHIN
NAEFANCHIN
1.- Shodan
2.- Nidan
3.- Sandan
PASSAI
PASSAI
1.- Dai
2.- Sho
3.- Matsumura
4.- Oyadomari
KUSHANKU
KUSHANKU
1.- Sho
2.- Dai
3.- Chibana
4.- Kishimoto
5.- Chatanyara
6.- Takuarita
Wanshu
WANSHU
1.- Wanshu (Tomari no)
2.- Kyan
ANANKU
ANANKU
1.- Sho
2.- Dai
Chinto
CHINTO
1.- Chinto (Shuri)
2.- Kyan
Jion
1.- Rohai
2.- Wankan
3.- Jion
4.- Jiin
5.- Gojushiho
6.- Shuri no Seisan
Sushi no Kon
BO
1.- Sushi no Kon
2.-Tenryu no Kon
3.- Shisanaka no Kon

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